Book Review : Life Mantras

Blurb View:

lifemantras“After having gone through the book, you will definitely and convincingly realize that to achieve peace, true happiness, contentment, satisfaction and also to attain continuous progress in life in terms of material gains, respect and love, you need not depend on anybody in this world. It all depends on you. It is all in your hands.”—‘Saharasri’ Subrata Roy Sahara “Nobody does anything for anyone. All do for themselves either for more and more material gains or to save and escape from any kind of material losses or from mental-emotional dissatisfaction or for getting more and more mental-emotional satisfaction. Therefore, no one sacrifices for anyone. When no one does anything for anyone, there is no justification in expecting any returns.” The author goes on to explain that to make life truly beautiful, one also needs to understand the basic truths with which we are born or the basic instincts inherent in us all. So for a positive outcome one has to learn the psychological or the emotional aspects of life, in other words, the realities of life or the entire philosophy of life. As you get immersed in the potent energy of these ‘Life Mantras’, you will slowly find a change, a sense of fulfillment, a self-motivation coming in you. You will thus be led to the ultimate realization that the journey of life is indeed a truly blissful and an enlightening experience.

Review: 

In Life Mantras, India’s top corporate honcho Mr. Subrata Roy shares real-life lessons by touching upon many aspects of human thoughts and emotions. Right at the outset, he begins by saying that every human is unique by himself. Thereby, he discusses the psychological and emotional aspects of life. Gradually he moves on to ways of achieving happiness, satisfaction, content life and more. While he talks about motivation, he boldly puts it forth that money does motivate just as esteem and love. He further grabs attention by saying that we only work for ourselves and our own advantages. Gradually as the book progresses, the reader learns that there are seven health stages of human being and four types of knowledge. And of course at the end, he writes about ego and its woes. Overall, ‘Life Mantras’ gives us a deep insight into the basic realities of life.

Mr. Subrata Roy Sahara laid the foundation of Sahara India Pariwar with mere 2000 rupees with three workers in the year 1978. But today his company boasts of 12 lakh fellow workers. Presently, he is in Tihar jail, from where he has written this book. To write a book in the prison isn’t an easy affair but for him this isn’t the end. Life Mantras is the first one in the trilogy, ‘Thoughts from Tihar’. As of now, this one is an exhaustive amalgamation of his experiences, observations, interactions and more.

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That Which Must Not Be Named

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This piece was pending since long. No, it isn’t about a blogging contest or a product/book review. I don’t believe in creating a Utopian blog that oozes paradoxes in the paradise of blogosphere. You’ll find them aplenty and you’re free to hop off in search of gayer blogs. Each of us has secrets, including writers. And since most of them are shy people, it is often exemplified in their works. A line here or a passage there, opening up small attics of memories and secrets in the stories they write.

But this isn’t about writing. This is about – not writing. I think the last time I wrote fiction goes back to two years ago. Well, I have plots brewing in my head but they haven’t been converted on paper since long. There’s a reason why not, and that is the whole crux of this article. I have diagnosed myself with what I call LD (Literary Depression), and I’m already tired of it. I know friends, people, writers, bloggers, who have serious LD but are ashamed to admit it. It is definitely considered downmarket. In our country, you’re still not allowed to talk about any kind of depression – be it literary, personal or professional. While we still don’t come out about personal reasons for depression unless we’re celebrities/film stars, LD is probably worse. If you are diagnosed with LD, you’re doomed as a writer. The publishers would trash you (sooner), your family would abandon you, readers would steer clear of your blog, and friends/fellow bloggers (the worst part of it) would PITY you.

Let me make it clear in the beginning – LD is not what we call Writer’s Block. It’s worse, the worst, actually. In the latter case, you are just unable to write. There are stories and characters swimming in your head, and you can’t catch them to make a good stew. But in LD, you lose everything – your confidence, conviction of being a writer, plots, characters, stories, twists, sentence construction – all of it goes on a toss. And you’re left with naught. The very feeling of naught, void, of being unworthy of a single printed word. Every article you read, every book you touch, every newspaper you pick up, every film you watch gives you a dump. A well constructed sentence in an otherwise poor article makes you realize that you probably can’t write better than them. You read nincompoops and feel it in your bones that you haven’t written in eons, they have books and you don’t. Trust me, LD is all encompassing. It affects your writing, your reading, your perceptive abilities and your sensibilities. You not only can’t write, you can’t even read. Every book makes you feel inadequate, every article invokes that sense of loss (of writing) inside you and you take solace in staples – like I have, in reading Bangla books, my childhood favourites.

LD is a slow killer. It takes eons to even detect it, and when you’re done, it probably gets too late to recover. I’m not ashamed of LD, just tired of it. But, there is hope, always, that someday you’ll be able to write again.

I’m certain that I will write again.

Memories In March

Image Courtesy: BlogAdda

Image Courtesy: BlogAdda

Memories are best served cold. They are created while you’re young, so you can carry them inside your head till it is alive. As you grow old, day by day, it’s time to ruminate on the memories, warm them up and have them served apiece within a mundane daily routine. There are some that don’t taste the same after days or years, and then there are others that sizzle up with time and fill your senses with longing for loved ones.

Watching young ones in the family grow up is a beautiful process that enriches one and makes for endless memories. I’ve had the scope to witness my young sister-in-laws (SIL) transit from school to college and transform into beautiful ladies from cranky teenagers. For a large part though, we’ve been living in radically different cities and corresponding through occasional phone calls, text messages and holidays. The moments spent there would be hurried and sporadic, in a frenzy over a few days to soak away the minutes slowly into our togetherness. We’d catch a movie, hop off to lunches, meet at their places, our place and any other relatives nearby, sneak away time for a chat on the terrace while mothers and aunts carried on their chitter-chatter. Each holiday would remain a collage of these moments, with images popping up in our minds months later, causing roars of laughter on either side over a call.

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